Eclipse Day 2017

Eclipse Day 2017

Are you ready to experience a natural phenomenon no human action can disrupt? You’ll get your chance August 21, 2017. If you are in Western Washington, you’ll be able to see a partial solar eclipse starting about 9:08 a.m. and ending about 11:38 a.m. The maximum coverage will occur at 10:20 a.m. Times are local for the Seattle area. It’s important to note that the only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters, such as “eclipse glasses,” or handheld solar viewers. NASA has the authoritative information on safety on their Eclipse 101 – Safety web page at https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/safety .

Apart from the excitement of viewing an eclipse of the sun, the event presents scientists with opportunities to study and collect data. What happens in the atmosphere and on the earth’s surface when the light is blocked, even temporarily? How are radio wave transmissions affected by the temporary loss of solar energy? How does losing sunlight, out of the natural rhythm affect animal behavior? These are the kind of questions around which scientists, both professional and amateur, are building research projects.

The total solar eclipse has been coined the Great American Solar Eclipse because totality will sweep the nation from the Pacific to the Atlantic oceans. Nearly everyone in the U.S. can reach a place to view this total solar eclipse within one day’s drive. NASA is using this event to rekindle excitement over celestial events and the science behind them. If you are interested in getting more information about the eclipse, including links to watching live streaming video of the eclipse as it starts its path across the nation in Oregon visit https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov .